What made the good Samaritan good?

Parable of the Good Samaritan

30 Jesus replied with a story: “A Jewish man was traveling from Jerusalem down to Jericho, and he was attacked by bandits. They stripped him of his clothes, beat him up, and left him half dead beside the road.

31 “By chance a priest came along. But when he saw the man lying there, he crossed to the other side of the road and passed him by. 32 A Temple assistant[b] walked over and looked at him lying there, but he also passed by on the other side.

33 “Then a despised Samaritan came along, and when he saw the man, he felt compassion for him. 34 Going over to him, the Samaritan soothed his wounds with olive oil and wine and bandaged them. Then he put the man on his own donkey and took him to an inn, where he took care of him. 35 The next day he handed the innkeeper two silver coins,[c] telling him, ‘Take care of this man. If his bill runs higher than this, I’ll pay you the next time I’m here.’

36 “Now which of these three would you say was a neighbor to the man who was attacked by bandits?” Jesus asked.

37 The man replied, “The one who showed him mercy.”

Then Jesus said, “Yes, now go and do the same.”

The first answer I give is that it was not his money. American nationalism and the worship of wealth has ingrained itself into our teaching so much that we sometimes say that the good Samaritan was no good without his money. We have highlighted a piece of this scripture that bears very little importance. We also run the risk of implying that you are not good, can’t help, can’t impact, can’t give, etc if you don’t have a lot of money, which is of course not true.

There is a very good chance that both the priest and the Levite were well off in terms of money. Neither one of them was called the good neighbor.

The good Samaritan was good because when he saw the man, he felt compassion for him. He went to him, helped him, and showed the man mercy. The two denarii could have been very little to him, or it could have meant everything to him. He could have taken the man to his own home and been called good. He could have taken the man to a friend’s house with an extra room and still been called good. He could have stayed on the side of the road with him and been called good. His mercy, compassion, and kindness is what made him good.

Matthew 9: 13 Then he added, “Now go and learn the meaning of this Scripture: ‘I want you to show mercy, not offer sacrifices.’

Matthew 12:7 ‘I want you to show mercy, not offer sacrifices.

When the five thousand needed fed Jesus said you feed them. The disciples said they didn’t have enough money. Jesus said give me what you do have. He then blessed it and fed the people. You can read it here.

Do what you can with what you have in your compassion for people, and Jesus will bless it.

You are enough. Just you kneeling down and having compassion is enough.

God is for you, and I am for you!

How to live your life kingdom first part 2.

If you didn’t get a chance to read part 1 you can read it here.

The third practical thing we can do to live our lives kingdom first is to accept one another. This is not the same thing as the current move we see in the world right now where hateful people are demanding others to accept them. This is us deciding that we know other people are flawed just like we are, and we are going to be patient with them.

We should be willing to associate with the “lowly”, and care for those that receive less honor in the body of Christ.

The word of God says that we should be at peace with one another, that we should live in harmony, and accept one another. It says that we should bear with one another being kind, compassionate, sympathetic, and forgiving. It also says that we should be hospitable without grumbling, but with joy.

God even tells us in His word to confess our sins to one another so that we can pray for each other. There is a really good reason why nobody does this, and it’s because we don’t accept each other. For too long we have been doing things the opposite way. Instead of patience, kindness, compassion, and forgiveness, we have jumped to conclusions, been hateful, condemned people, and judged people. Furthermore, we have been this way to people based on things as simple as how they look, or dress. So we now have a built-in fear about sharing our struggles with others. We may even want to share our struggle to ease our burden, but we won’t risk the response we might get.

We have to shift in this area not only as the body of Christ, but individually in our own minds. We need to accept others, but we also need to be willing to share our struggles with others. I myself, I struggle with sharing my burdens with others, but I’m getting better about it.

This isn’t a hard thing, it should not be hard for us to be patient, kind, compassionate, and forgiving toward others in their struggles if we are honest with ourselves about our own. When you know you have a log in your own eye, it’s easy to look past the toothpick in someone else’s eye.

Don’t kick people while they are down, choose to accept them, and help them back up. If you live long enough you will need help yourself someday.

Live your life kingdom first!

God is for you, and I am for you!

 

Scriptures I used for this post:

Matthew 7, Mark 9, Romans 12, Romans 15, 1 Corinthians 12, Ephesians 4, Colossians 3, 1 Peter 3, 1 Peter 4, and James 5.

 

2 things Tuesday! 2 things you can do to live your life Kingdom first!

  1. Have compassion on the people and the culture around you. There is no lack of opportunities for us to reach people. The multitudes are stressed, dispirited, anxious, and wore out with no shepherd to help them. You can be that person! Insert yourself into the culture around you and proclaim the good news of the King and His Kingdom. Good news is always accepted! Read an example of Jesus in action here in Matthew 9:35-38.
  2. Relate and reveal. Relate with people where they are at, not where you think they should be. Reveal your similar struggles, and the testimonies that Jesus turned them into. It’s hard to help someone if you can not truly relate to them. I can give a great example from my life. For most of my adult life I never had any financial hardships, and when people would ask for advice in this area I would say it’s simple, just do this, this, and this. Now that I have experienced a financial struggle, I know what it feels like, and I can truly relate. I can say it’s hard, it hurts, and this is what I did, and what I am doing to be victorious in that battle.

 

Live your life Kingdom first!

Levi